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Put This On’s Inside Track for the week of August 24th - August 30th

putthison:

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Here are our hand-selected favorites from eBay for this week, plus heads-up on recommended sales. If you’re a member of the Inside Track, click through, and log in with your Member.ly username and password. If you’re not a member, you can join now for just $5 a month - you’ll get access to one of these members-only lists every week, and your membership supports Put This On. 

See the rest →

— 5 days ago with 53 notes
#clothing 
bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 
Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.
I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 

Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

amazi-girl's boots should be uggs

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.

I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

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When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

image

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

image

(via racheldukes)

— 6 days ago with 3085 notes
#comics  #dialogue  #education 

jacobs-stabber:

asylum-art:

'All the Wild Horses' by Andrew McGibbon

And all the wild inspiration… I’m such a sucker for insane colours and lightnings!

(via metanoianmayhem)

— 1 week ago with 5842 notes
#horses  #animals  #reference 
qnq:

kyuenkyu:

This site has some cool arm anatomy, especially about how it changes as it twists, which is often neglected in ref!

Main account reblog if you didn’t see this fun thing *v *

qnq:

kyuenkyu:

This site has some cool arm anatomy, especially about how it changes as it twists, which is often neglected in ref!

Main account reblog if you didn’t see this fun thing *v *

(via hawkstars)

— 1 week ago with 31986 notes
#reference  #arms 

the-goddamazon:

talkdowntowhitepeople:

do you want to know something?? I always wondered what the hell kind of hairstyle the Ancient Egyptians were trying to portray with depictions like these

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and this

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until I did my hair this morning and 

oh

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welp

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you can take the noses off our statues but until you find a way to take Egypt out of Africa we’re still going to find ourselves

Can we call it the Egyptian Crown, now?

(via dame-c)

— 2 weeks ago with 7601 notes
#hair  #depictions  #egypt  #art 

fitgrills:

Berezowski gifs incoming. Have this for now.

(via curiously-chamomile-queer)

— 2 weeks ago with 16853 notes
#bodies  #yassss  #reference  #muscles 

becausebirds:

Goshawk testing its flying capabilities. It is shown flying through a circular opening, horizontal opening, vertical opening and a tunnel. [video]

(via curiously-chamomile-queer)

— 3 weeks ago with 21776 notes
#animation reference  #birds 

algenpfleger:

Here’s steps for a painting that was pretty defining for me as an artist. It’s a bit older now, but still gives me feels and feels belong on a tumblr. Took three or so days I believe, all from imagination.

(via edennova)

— 3 weeks ago with 68130 notes
#art 

the-goddamazon:

bookishboi:

i-kool-kat:

WOW. OUU. WOWW. WOAH.oooOOOuuUUU. WOAW. WAAW.

Is he sweating In the food tho cause that’s a problem.

LOL

(Source: zoahealth.blogspot.kr, via dame-c)

— 4 weeks ago with 53254 notes
#reference  #bodies  #men 

federyk-is-a-rising-demon:

bugsuit:

hoonding replied to your post: realtalk ive been drawing wings with v…

yeah your wings are pretty fukkin rad i really need to learn from you on this subject tbh because mine are schiesse

overly simplified method: draw red zigzag first

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important structure reference for when you’re actually putting the feathers on:

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i mostly cheat and just scribble so much you cant see me fucking up the actual feathers but yeah im lazy

THANKS 

(via dame-c)

— 1 month ago with 22568 notes
#wings  #tutorial 
Anonymous asked: I'm curious have you ever had a relaxer? Can you post a throw back photo of it???


Answer:

eatmeallnight:

dorkch0ps:

herpowerisherown:

minusthelove:

anomaly1:

black--lamb:

i had a relaxer up until i was 20 lol (my mom was a beautician and straightened it when i was 5)

i cut it into a bob in highschool

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then i rebelled (and wore way too much makeup):

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then came the bowl cut in college…fml:

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then the try to look like a sorority girl look:

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then did this mohawk…thing to it in the summer and dyed it red (my eyebrows were also on the battlefield)

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then i cut that shit off

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no more relaxers

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and in the last year….

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(protective style…damn i wore that sweater a lot..)

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(i skipped a few styles, but you get the gist) 

This post is like watching a flower bloom

^my exact thoughts

glory

I will never not reblog

Why is she so perfect

— 1 month ago with 83862 notes
#hair 

disneyvillainsforjustice:

heisenbreadcrumbz:

infinidegree:

jiizzzlle:

victoriatheunicorn:

i think i want to see a cartoon about these guys

Omg.. The way the cat slows down to allow the bun to catch up, probably because it knows how much the bun likes to stop and look at stuff

has anyone noticed THAT THE BUNNY IS TRYING TO WALK LIKE THE CAT.

BUNNIES FUCKING HOP

ok but maybe the bunny has a crush on  the kitty

My one cat post for the day. Have some cute.
- Mod Helga

(Source: onlycatgifs, via nerdy-knitting-german)

— 1 month ago with 512092 notes
#animation reference  #animals  #cuties  #holy shit 

(Source: vinegod, via edennova)

— 1 month ago with 44500 notes
#bears  #reference  #animals  #animation  #cuties