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Mostly art things.

I won’t be able to find it, but there’s a post going around with a big archive of downloadable pdfs of art books, the post has how-to-draw-manga book covers for images but there’s a TON of stuff in the archive. Including Vilppu and fantastic stuff.

Do recommend.

— 1 week ago
#so 41 downloads later  #that is  #aha  #actually me  #resources 
ayajade:

cxline:

thoselonelyeyes:

fullmoon-unicorn:

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

So amazing

Holy

ayajade:

cxline:

thoselonelyeyes:

fullmoon-unicorn:

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

So amazing

Holy

(Source: fullmoonwolves, via curiously-chamomile-queer)

— 1 week ago with 217330 notes
#landscape  #reference 
artist tips

thefrogman:

suchirolle:

rileyav:

don’t save as jpeg

as a former yearbook editor and designer, let me explain this further

if youre only planning on posting your art online, them please save it as .png ;this is also better for transparencies as well

BUT

please, if youre planning of printing your art, NEVER use png. it makes the quality of the image pretty shitty. use jpeg or pdf instead. and always set your work at 300dpi to get a better printing quality - this means, the images are crisper and sharper and theres no slight blurriness. i had a talk with my friend who is currently taking design, and pdf is much better to use when youre working with a bigger publishing company because it still has the layers intact, but if youre only planning on printing your stuff at staples or at some small publishing store, the jpeg is the way to go.

this has been a public service announcement

This post has about 30,000 notes and a lot of back and forth on what you should and shouldn’t do. Part of this is because there is a lot of personal preference when it comes to printing. People like to work with different formats and equipment because that is what they learned on. They achieve basically the same things through different methods and much like Mac/PC… there is much debate.

I don’t have a degree in anything but maybe I can clear a few things up.

First of all, if you are printing things yourself, there is no reason to convert your photoshop or illustrator document to anything else before printing. So keeping it a PSD or AI file is fine. If you are having someone else print your document, ask them how they prefer the file to be formatted. They will choose the best option for their experience and equipment.

Keep in mind you will get sharper prints if you adjust your document’s pixels per inch to match the printer. Epsons are 360ppi. Most other manufacturers are 300ppi. Sometimes people erroneously refer to this as dpi, so just be aware of that.

I wrote a more detailed post on how big you should make your art here.

On file formats…

JPEG - This compresses your image to make the file size smaller. This can cause quality loss because it is basically throwing away data. This is especially hard on text, graphics, and simpler artwork. Fine lines can get jagged and pixelated during the compression process. However, photos and photo-realistic art will look just fine. 

That means JPEGs are ideal for posting photographs or highly detailed artwork online. They are compatible with all browsers and will load much faster for people with slow connections. At the sizes people view JPEGs on the web, it will be hard to see the loss of quality.

As long as the resolution is good and the compression is minimal, you can still get nice prints from a jpeg, but it is not ideal.

TIFF - This is basically a super JPEG. It has no compression and is compatible with most image editors. It handles colors well and prints nicely. Due to its robust compatibility, most printers can handle TIFFs with no worries. If I had to save a file into a flattened format, TIFF is probably my choice. The disadvantage is that the file sizes can be very large and you cannot publish TIFFs online in very many places. 

PNG - These are typically used for web-based graphic design or simple artwork. They are compatible with all browsers and allow you to preserve transparency. They also render text and fine lines much better than JPEGs. If you were posting more cartoon-like artwork online or something very graphical (charts and graphs) this would be a good option. File sizes can get big with more complicated images. I don’t recommend saving photos or photo-realistic artwork as PNGs.

In my experience I have found that color rendering with PNGs is a bit unreliable, so I would probably avoid this format for printing purposes. 

PDF - This is basically a container. You can throw whatever you want into a PDF. It will maintain the quality of the images you put inside it. PDFs are great for multi-page documents. Especially if they are a mix of graphics, art, text, and photos. If you don’t have experience using publishing software like InDesign, this is a good alternative for these types of jobs. If you only have one page to print, I’m not sure it is worth the trouble of making it a PDF. 

RGB vs CMYK 
I recommend always starting your document in the RGB colorspace and converting it later only if needed. It is rare that you do not publish on the web, and RGB is much more suited for that. Converting from RGB to CMYK is much easier than the other way around. 

If you are printing yourself, you are probably using an inkjet. Modern inkjets do great RGB conversion and in some cases will handle it better than CMYK. You can try both formats, but in the end you will just have to accept the fact that nothing you can do will get you a perfect color match. The goal is to get a good print. View it and judge it independently of what is on your screen. Do not drive yourself mad trying to get them to match perfectly. 

If you are having someone else print your work, again, ask them what they prefer. If they have large offset printers, they may ask for CMYK. If they have inkjets, they may just want RGB files. If this is a very large printing operation, your printer should want to do any color conversions themselves. If they do not, I might suggest looking for a different printer.

I hope that is helpful. Happy printing.

(via littlestspider)

— 1 week ago with 40274 notes
#reference  #file types  #printing 
MY GRANDPA WANTED TO BE AN ARTIST

honerablerosemary:

BUT HE HAD 7 KIDS AND A WIFE TO FEED SO HE ENDED UP OWNING A GROCERY STORE AFTER SERVING IN WW2

TODAY MY DAD WAS CLEANING THE HOUSE AND FOUND SOME PENCIL DRAWINGS THAT MY GRANDPA DID AND ASKED IF I WANTED TO HAVE THEM AND I

image

CAN WE JUST LOOK AT THIS

image

MY BAD WEBCAM PICTURES DON’T EVEN DO THEM JUSTICE LIKE LOOK AT THESE

image

MY GRANDPA NEVER BECAME A FAMOUS ARTIST

image

BUT I WANT TO MAKE HIM KNOWN

(via curiously-chamomile-queer)

— 1 week ago with 422336 notes
#art  #reference  #traditional art  #best  #grandpa 

lilaira:

Couldn’t pick the one version.

(via nerdy-knitting-german)

— 2 weeks ago with 4703 notes
#art  #cuties  #dog 
flowercrownprincess:

valentines gift for the princeling heh
muslim wonder woman was jay’s idea and i brought her 2 life hope u like it sena <3

flowercrownprincess:

valentines gift for the princeling heh

muslim wonder woman was jay’s idea and i brought her 2 life hope u like it sena <3

(Source: falloutgirlongirl, via curiously-chamomile-queer)

— 2 weeks ago with 20106 notes
#wonder woman  #character design  #best 

lexxercise:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks lately about the brushes and textures I use in my work, so here’s a BIG FAT REFERENCE POST for those of you who were curious! Bear in mind that I’m really lazy and don’t know what half the settings do, so don’t be afraid to experiment to figure out what works best for you :>

BRUSHES

Pencil

I use the pencil tool with SAI’s native paper texture both for sketching and for applying opaque color with no blending. Lower opacities give it the feel of different pencil hardnesses, while full opacity makes it more like a palette knife, laying down hard-edged, heavy color for detail work or eventual blending with other brushes.

Ink Pen

Mostly made this because I’m lazy and I didn’t want to have to keep turning my textures off/opacity up when I wanted to ink something (even though I don’t do it very often), or lay down flat colors. I find the line quality to be much more crisp than Photoshop, and you can manually adjust in-program stabilization to help smooth out hand wobbles.

Round Brush

The plain ol’ brush tool acts as sort of an in-between for me in terms of brush flow. It’s heavier than my usual workhorse brush, for faster color application and rough blending, but not as heavy as the pencil tool, which has no blending at all. I like to use the canvas texture on this brush to help break up the unnatural smoothness that usually accompanies digital brushes, but it works just fine without.

Flat Brush

A brush tool set to flat bristle is by far my favorite to paint with. I don’t use any textures with it because I think the shape of the brush provides enough of that by itself. I use it for everything from rough washes to more refined shaping and polish. It’s just GREAT.

Watercolor

Best used for smooth blending, washes, gradients, and smoky atmospheric effects.

Cloud

Basically a grittier version of the watercolor tool, because too much smoothness weird me out. Good for clouds and fog, as the name suggests, or just less boring gradient fills.

TEXTURE OVERLAY

To further stave off the artificially smooth look of digital painting, I almost always overlay some sort of paper texture, and it’s almost always this one, which I scanned and edited myself. You’re all welcome to use it, no permission required!

Using overlays in SAI is just as easy as using them in Photoshop. Just paste the texture into its own layer above everything you want it to apply to, and change the layer mode to Overlay. That’s it!

Want a more prominent texture? Up the contrast. Something more subtle? Lower the contrast or reduce the layer opacity. You can also use a tinted overlay to adjust the overall palette and bring a little more color unity to an otherwise disparate piece! Just be aware that too much texture can hurt the readability of the work beneath it, so I’d err on the side of subtlety.

Hope that helps!

-L

(via knittynattys)

— 4 weeks ago with 49785 notes
#brushes  #textures  #reference 

flameysaur:

youngtitan213:

hipster medusa

no more homework pls. ;A; 

Oh my god, this is so cool and amazing! THE SNAKE HAS LITTLE GLASSES!

(via curiously-chamomile-queer)

— 1 month ago with 21295 notes
#medusa  #cool shit  #designs  #hipster 
tysonmurphy:

I took a screenshot from Sword in the Stone and painted over it a little bit.  Really fun way to jump right in and practice lighting.  Hope I get some time to do more of these!

tysonmurphy:

I took a screenshot from Sword in the Stone and painted over it a little bit.  Really fun way to jump right in and practice lighting.  Hope I get some time to do more of these!

(via nerdy-knitting-german)

— 1 month ago with 72966 notes
#art  #do this 

flygex-eatin-on-softies:

This drawing as a reward for pledgers in her project.

Daily Dogs

By: Elisa Kwon

Wow, please design a show or a movie or something.  Holy crap.

(Source: cgominha, via edennova)

— 1 month ago with 24455 notes
#art  #wow 
jetgreguar:

iguanamouth:

a monster described to me by a four year old. it eats trees. its afraid of music. it carries a bag of bad carrots and steals human feet. it can hear without ears. it wears light up shoes and is always mad because one of them doesn’t work

if you arent following lauren what the hell are you doing

jetgreguar:

iguanamouth:

a monster described to me by a four year old. it eats trees. its afraid of music. it carries a bag of bad carrots and steals human feet. it can hear without ears. it wears light up shoes and is always mad because one of them doesn’t work

if you arent following lauren what the hell are you doing

(via curiously-chamomile-queer)

— 1 month ago with 2479 notes
#art  #cool shit  #monsters